Basic sanitation history during Modern Age
Basic sanitation history during Modern Age

In the Modern Age (1453-1789), besides the book of Frontinus, Vitruvius’ books have been translated, in 1673. A methodology to measure the flow and the outflow speed was developed, yet establishing, that the rivers and fountains and underground waters were formed by rain. The supply model conceived during the Middle Ages was in decadency. In Paris, in the late fifteenth century, the distribution of water was controlled through pipes under the supervision of the municipality.

Brazil enters the sanitation map in 1620, when the works of the Carioca River aqueduct were initiated to supply Rio de Janeiro, by initiative of Aires Saldanha, with a length of 270m and height of 18m. The work was completed over a hundred years later, when it was delivered to the population the first collective system of water supply in the country, in 1723.

In 1664, the piped water distribution was increased with the manufacture of cast iron pipes molded by Johan Jordan, France, and its installation in the palace of Versailles. Shortly later, Johann invented the centrifugal pump, and in 1775, Joseph Bramah invented the toilet in England.